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Quote Round Up: Editorial Denounces Challenge to Contraceptive Coverage Rules, Provider Speaks Out Against Harassment, More

Quote Round Up: Editorial Denounces Challenge to Contraceptive Coverage Rules, Provider Speaks Out Against Harassment, More

November 12, 2015 — Media outlets and key stakeholders in women's health call on the Supreme Court to uphold the federal contraceptive coverages rules' accommodation, condemn violence against abortion providers and more.

"Th[e] lawsuit, like several others before it, is a well orchestrated assault on the right of women to control their bodies, and thus the course of their own lives, by deciding if and when they will have a child." -- A New York Times editorial, urging the Supreme Court to uphold the federal contraceptive coverage rules' accommodation for not-for-profits that hold themselves out as religious and oppose contraception (New York Times, 11/6). The Supreme Court agreed to hear seven challenges against the accommodation as a consolidated case, which likely will be called Zubik v. Burwell (Women's Health Policy Report, 11/9).

"Native American women are finally going to be getting the health care they're entitled to and deserved all along." -- Alexa Kolbi-Molina, an attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union, on the Indian Health Services' decision to finalize a written policy requiring IHS-run facilities to provide emergency contraception to Native American women of all ages without a prescription (Women's Health Policy Report, 10/19).

"The stakes couldn't be higher, either for women who live in the growing number of states governed by anti-abortion politicians or for the court itself." -- New York Times columnist Linda Greenhouse, on the policy and legal issues at stake in the lawsuit over Texas' omnibus antiabortion-rights law (HB 2). The Supreme Court is weighing whether to review the case (Women's Health Policy Report, 10/16).

"[T]his kind of abusive behavior doesn't happen in other fields." -- Diane Horvath-Casper, an obstetrician-gynecologist and a family planning fellow, in a Washington Post opinion piece discussing the harassment that she and other abortion providers routinely face for doing their jobs. She notes that while some U.S. residents might oppose abortion rights, everyone "should ... agree that no physicians ought to be terrorized for doing their jobs" (Women's Health Policy Report, 10/30).

"Instead of criminalizing Asian American and immigrant women with these onerous laws, states should be creating culturally sensitive resources that help them safely exercise their reproductive rights and access quality mental-health care." -- Miriam Yeung, executive director of the National Asian Pacific American Women's Forum, in a Washington Post opinion piece lambasting racially biased abortion restrictions, including feticide laws and bans on abortions based on the sex of the fetus (Women's Health Policy Report, 11/6).