National Partnership for Women & Families

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February 22, 2013

FEATURED BLOG

"Anything But Delicate: Alabama's Solution to Substance Abuse During Pregnancy," Josie Sustaire, Law Students for Reproductive Justice's "Repo Repro": An Alabama law originally aimed at protecting children from methamphetamine labs "has been expanded through litigation to encompass fetal exposure to drugs in utero, essentially offering legislator[s] a backhanded way of circumventing a woman's rights," law student Sustaire writes. She notes that more than 60 women have been incarcerated under the statute. "We must find a way to reconcile the rights of women with the interests of the state in ensuring the health and safety of infants," Sustaire writes, adding, "Drug treatment options seem like a much more beneficial option" (Sustaire, "Repo Repro," LSRJ, 2/20).

 

FEATURED BLOG

"Something To Celebrate: Philadelphia Board of Health Calls for Public Funding, Insurance Coverage for Reproductive Health Care," Claire Cooper, RH Reality Check: The Philadelphia Board of Health on Thursday passed a resolution calling on state and federal leaders to "maintain existing public funding for comprehensive reproductive health care and to repeal current discriminatory policies that deny coverage for abortion care," Cooper writes. "The resolution makes a strong case that women -- regardless of their income -- deserve access to a full range of safe, affordable reproductive health care services throughout their life," she adds. She notes that the move is "incredibly encouraging" because "the damage of current restrictive policies is so clear" (Cooper, RH Reality Check, 2/21).

What others are saying about efforts to advance reproductive health:

~ "What Andrew Cuomo's Abortion Proposal Says About Access in 2013," Kate Pickert, Time's "Swampland."

~ "Andrew Cuomo's Late-Term Abortion Push," Aaron Blake, Washington Post's "The Fix."

~ "How Abortion Opponents Have Forced a Double Standard for Advances in Reproductive Health," Tara Culp-Ressler, Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress."