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Video Round Up: Planned Parenthood's Fight for a New Orleans Clinic, House Lawmaker Discusses Reversal on Abortion Right

Video Round Up: Planned Parenthood's Fight for a New Orleans Clinic, House Lawmaker Discusses Reversal on Abortion Rights, More

February 5, 2015 — In today's clips, Cosmopolitan's Jill Filipovic delves into efforts by abortion-rights opponents to stop the opening of a new comprehensive Planned Parenthood clinic in New Orleans. Elsewhere, Rep. Tim Ryan (D-Ohio) explains why, in a reversal, he has come to support abortion rights.

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MSNBC's Melissa Harris-Perry talks with a panel about how Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast, in its attempt to open a new clinic in New Orleans, "has faced just about every obstacle imaginable" from opponents of abortion rights. The clinic will offer a comprehensive slate of reproductive health care services.

Cosmopolitan's Jill Filipovic, who investigated abortion-rights opponents' interference in the construction project and opening of the clinic, explains that while many New Orleans residents "realize that Louisiana has a whole slew of health care challenges, and they want this clinic built," antiabortion-rights opponents, particularly outside groups, have fought against the clinic, including by threatening businesses that might support PPGC's efforts (Harris-Perry, "Melissa Harris-Perry," MSNBC, 1/24).


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Rep. Tim Ryan (D-Ohio) and MSNBC's Lawrence O'Donnell discuss why, in a reversal, Ryan now supports abortion rights. Ryan explains, "I just feel like Uncle Sam should not be sitting in the doctor's office ... having any role in making" decisions about abortion (O'Donnell, "The Last Word," MSNBC, 1/28).


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Slate's Aisha Harris speaks with Paul Weitz, director of the film "Grandma," and Lily Tomlin, who plays a woman in the film who becomes closer with her granddaughter after she asks Tomlin's character for financial help to obtain an abortion. Tomlin notes that the topic of abortion used to be far more "taboo" in the 1960s and 1970s, but that more people are open to talking about the subject now (Harris, Slate, 1/30).