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Video Round Up: Texas Rep. Decries Hypocrisy of Abortion Restrictions, Comedian Satirizes Antiabortion-Rights Lawmakers

Video Round Up: Texas Rep. Decries Hypocrisy of Abortion Restrictions, Comedian Satirizes Antiabortion-Rights Lawmakers, More

May 1, 2015 — In today's clips, Texas Rep. Jessica Farrar (D) points out the hypocrisy of antiabortion-rights lawmakers opposing legislation to support breastfeeding women and families. Elsewhere, SNL's Cecily Strong calls out antiabortion-rights lawmakers at the White House Correspondents' Dinner.

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Texas Rep. Jessica Farrar (D) speaks out against state lawmakers who added an antiabortion-rights amendment to an unrelated bill (HB 2510), which would alter the state's law (HB 2) banning abortion after 20 weeks of pregnancy to remove exceptions in instances of fetal anomalies. HB 2510 was later sent back to committee for revision.

Farrar notes that state lawmakers who are opposed to abortion rights have also refused to back legislation to help assist breastfeeding women and families, adding that "the hypocrisy must stop" (NARAL Pro-Choice Texas, 4/24).


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Cecily Strong, a cast member with NBC's "Saturday Night Live," satirizes antiabortion-rights lawmakers imposing abortion restrictions during the White House Correspondents' Dinner, which is attended by politicians and members of the press. In her comments, she pinpoints the hypocrisy of politicians legislating women's bodies (Huff Post/AOL News, 4/26).


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MSNBC's Jose Diaz-Balart talks with NBC's Frank Thorp about the compromise reached by Senate lawmakers on antiabortion-rights language in a human trafficking bill (S 178) that was later passed by the chamber. Thorp notes that while the agreement prevents an expansion of existing restrictions on abortion funding by not permanently applying the Hyde Amendment to a survivors' compensation fund, it also still subjects funds for health care services for survivors to the restrictions.

The agreement also cleared the way for the Senate to confirm now-U.S. attorney general Loretta Lynch, who had been nominated for more than five months (Diaz-Balart, "The Rundown," MSNBC, 4/21).